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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
of what defensive weapons were and not getting into all the details there but there's a struggle to prove with the understanding is. the long-range bomber to the americans have about 750-mile range that they were also very old. they were obsolete and not a match for the american defense in the southeast united states. but the problem was, and let's backtrack. kennedy himself did not think that this was a particularly big problem and it comes through on the tapes is the one who is the least worried about the il-28. he is actually on paper a few times saying things like we don't want to get hung up on these. i fell in reasonable trying to get these avenue is trying to put himself in khrushchev's position but he he is actually not particularly thinking itself but his advisers around him are. robinette macnamara is one of the most vocal about this and he says look we have to get these out. even if they are not a military threat in a clinical sense, the american public these are not going to be allowed to stay because we can't -- and george buckley argued for getting rid of them so kennedy is
arm of the nation's defense. but in the daily activities that we conduct, we do a lot of things that are important not only to the members of the military and the members of this country, but that have a significant effort in advancing the well-being of others in the world. so, we tend to think of the obvious things. we stand for freedom of choice. we stand for people being able to go about their lives free from oppression and things we know a lot about. but in the process of doing that, we had a large group of people and the department of defense. they need medical care, and because many of them are working at a very high operations tempo and under a lot of stress, we want them to be in the absolute highest level of health that we can possibly provide. and so, we have a very, very healthy group of folks, and we work overtime to make sure they stay healthy. in the process of doing that, we've learned a lot about people, diseases, physiology and on and on and on. one of the things we have to offer, we in this case i believe being the department of defense in this country is shari
than defensive. some said to kennedy and around the table that, you know, these could be a threat to the hemisphere, cuban subversion, which was greatly feared. in fact, the big fear was that not so much that cuba was a threat, but it was spreading to other countries, and brazil, was feared, would be a second cuba. kennedy and the advisers, tell me, the tapes you studied carefully in the aftermath, and i should mention, of course, david is going to be publishing, been editing volumes of the transfers -- come back to these later -- never accepted khrushchev's public rationale to deploy them, which was to detour an american invasion, detour another bay of pigs, but with the american forces, not cubans. they always put the worst case analysis and why all of these materials were there. is that fair to say that that view never shifted even though some of them were aware of the overt american operations against castro and intended to overthrow castro? >> guest: i'll get the first part of the question there too because i think it's interesting. there's an aspect that came through in rece
defensive and even some of the forces, there were some who said to kennedy these could be a threat to the hemisphere this is cubans subversion which we felt the big fear was not so much cuba was a threat they could be spreading to others like brazil might become a second cuba. kennedy and his advisers, to leave the states that you said to the custody does it carefully in the aftermath and i should mention that of course david is going to be publishing and has been editing volumes and we will come back to this never accepted christian's congressional for deploying these weapons to deter the invasion and the bay of pigs but with american forces, not cuban so they always put the worst-case analysis. is that fair to say that never shifted even though some of them were aware of the covert american operations against castro? >> guest: let me get the first part of your question, too bad because that's interesting. there was an aspect that has come through. first of all timothy naftali has brought out -- we've been talking about the frogs and the loaners. >> host: the delivery vehicles. >>
. talk to your hospital, and they will tell you defensive medicine occurs right here and in every community across america. if they make a mistake, they know they are going to be taken to court, but it is the doctors doing two procedures instead of one or checking into a hospital instead of outpatient service. we can talk about health care plans, the opportunity to buy health insurance. we can talk about the opportunity of allowing bigger pools to be created, expanding programs so we have more family practice. these are ideas we are willing and ready to prepare. we are not allowed to. >> senator tester, there are polls that show that montana and steve not like affordable care act. how can you sell it? >> that is the bottom line were you have a pre-existing condition. i am glad the congressman talk about selling across the state lines, about increasing general practitioners and family practice in the health-care bill. there is a lot of stuff in the health-care bill. i always get accused of not reading it. the health-ine isn' care bill extends health care for eight years. the mistak
to this at the highest level, leon panetta, secretary of defense said we don't want to attack iran. we hope that israel will not attack iran. but israel is a sovereign country, and have to make their own decisions about what they will do. you might ask what the reaction would be if you reverse the cast of characters. those of you who have antiquarian interest, you may remember there is a document called "the united nations charter" foundation of modern international law, which bars the threat or use of force in international affairs. there are two rogue states, the nine states and israel, which for him or which regard the charter and international law is just a boring relevance, so do what they like. and that is accepted. these are not just words. there is an ongoing war including terrorism, assassination of nuclear scientists, economic war, u.s. threats which have cut iran out of the international financial system. western military analysts identify what they call weapons of finance as acts of war, the justify violent responses when they are directed against us, that is. the united states is openly ca
to the future in as we look at a new defense strategy as we try to work through what the roles of the different services are, defense strategy, i also remind everybody that wall street will be downsizing during this time. the army, who at the beginning of calendar year 12 was popular will go down to 490,000 in the active component by the end of 17. we have significant deployed commitments. we are downsizing our army, and we are now looking to the future. one of the main things is granted make sure we have the right mix but i always talk about fashion executive arm and i really pay a lot of attention to. that's in strength, modernization and readiness. because in general terms those are the drivers of our budget. went to keep those imbalance. we want to learn from the lessons of the future, past drawdowns. some of the lessons that you can't get out of balance, because you get out of balance you start have been unready army. which leads to a hostile army, and, of course, was talk about the army of the task force and its impact and is an preparedness as it was asked to go into korea post-world war
the defense of marriage act was struck down by the courts. do you support this line do believe to believe marriages only between a man and a woman? dold: i've been clear from the beginning of my campaign that i believe -- life is hard, having a career's heart and having someone to be standing by your side in tough times but also in good times. if two people want to commit to a lifetime, god love them. >> moderator: brad schneider? schneider: i don't want to prevent to loving individuals from having a life together. one of the reasons why i supported a piece of legislation that would allow domestic partners who have health benefits and be able to be on their partner's health benefits and i've come forward with my party to say i believe civil union should be acceptable so we want to make sure they have these rights but i do believe marriage is between a man and a woman. dold: this as two distinct classes of people and people that want to make this commitment -- >> moderator: congressman's dold do you think that is
of homeland defense and security. the head of fema, there's been a lot of conference calls every single day on emergency response. ray lahood has been coordinating the response on the transportation system, but fema is coordinating the overall response. i'm sure that there will be requests for infrastructure, for people. it is a disaster beyond belief. and there has to be a commission to look at ways we can try and prevent this in the future. one of the problems in new york is a lot of the infrastructure was in the basement of buildings. for example the hospitals, they had their m.r.i.'s, these huge electrical systems. and othercies testimonies in the basement. it's all destroyed with the saltwater. i was touring n.y.u. medical yesterday, and the smell, the stench just from a few days was almost unbelievable. the combination of this type of electric communication systems rotting. everywhere you see on the lower east side, the pumps are working, trying to push water out. some of our larger institutions do have generators, but fema and the national guard and really the federal government are
now look to the future and look at a new defense strategy as we try to work through what the roles of the different services are and the defense strategy, i also remind everyone that we are also going to be downsizing during this time. the army, who at the beginning of calendar year 2012 was 570,000, will go down to 490,000 in the active component by the end of 2017. we have significant deployed commitments. we are downsizing our army, and we are now looking to the future. one of the main thing is we have to do is ensure we have the right mix. i always talk about my three rio stats that the secretary of army and i pay a lot of attention to. end strength, modernization, and readiness. because in general terms those are the drivers of our budget. we have to keep those in balance. we want to learn from the lessons of future -- past draw downs. some of the lessons is you can't get out of balance. because if you get out of balance you start to have an unready army. which leads to a hobbled army. we talk about task force smith and its impact and unpreparedness as was asked to go into kor
to the future and as we look at a new defense strategy as we try to work through what the roles of the different services are and the defense strategy i also remind everyone that we will be downsizing during this time. the army who at the beginning of calendar year 12 was a 570,000 will go down to 49,090,000 in the active component by the end of 17 so we have significant deployment commitments. we are downsizing our army and we are now looking to the future. one of the main things is we have to do is ensure we have the right mix so i talk about rea stats and the secretary of the army and i really pay a lot of attention to it. end strength, modernization and readiness. in general terms those are the drivers and we have to keep those imbalance. we want to learn from the lessons of the future of past drug downs and some of the lessons is you can't get out of balance because if you get out of balance you start to have an unready army which leads to a hollow army and of course we always talk about in the army task force and its impact and unpreparedness as it was asked to go in to korea forced world
defense strategy as we try to work through what the roles of the different services are and the defense strategy, i also remind everyone that we are also going to be downsizing during this time. the army, who at the beginning of calendar year 2012 was 570,000, will go down to 490,000 in the active component by the end of 2017. we have significant deployed commitments. we are downsizing our army, and we are now looking to the future. one of the main thing is we have to do is ensure we have the right mix. i always talk about my three rio stats that the secretary of army and i pay a lot of attention to. end strength, modernization, and readiness. because in general terms those are the drivers of our budget. we have to keep those in balance. we want to learn from the lessons of past draw downs. some of the lessons is you can't get out of balance. because if you get out of balance you start to have an unready army. which leads to a hobbled army. we talk about task force smith and its impact and unpreparedness as was asked to go into korea post-world war ii. we don't want that to happen again
with what mr. gregg said. the natural resources defense council ranked two of the beaches among best in the country for two years in a row. >> do have any advice on how to deal with these issues in the state? >> one of the students is my daughter. she is interested in these issues. i think delaware is a tremendous place. we have beautiful places, a beautiful environment and we have to work hard to make sure we're protecting that. i think a great environment is a bonus in terms of economic development. gov. peterson past the coastal zone act. people thought that was an economic -- it was an anti-jobs. it turned out to be the opposite. because we have such a beautiful delaware bay, businesses want to be here. that is why we're fake -- focused on the bayshore initiative. one of the objections i have is the thing of the power plant in the coastal zone. the pollutants are sulfur trade we have done is we have waived the requirement to put that manufacturing facility in the coastal zone. we did it under some crazy theory that this was great energy. i would say that jack -- let's follow the
on defense and more than the pentagon says we need. $25 trillion tax cuts would make president george w. bush look like a banker. he must have been asleep at the switch. you said like jerry mcguire "show me the money." you are the business guy. see me back after the election. who can take you seriously? here is my budget although it is not. see me about it after the election. the reason is there are only three options. if you want to repeal tax exemptions you have to cut the tax exemptions on the middle- class and governor romney says he will raise those taxes. or you can do what they have always done in just let the deficit explode again. when the economy goes it'll be a problem. or you could just gut the federal budget. gut funding for education. gut the student loan program. i spent $3 billion of your money to separate the human genome. he know how much economic activity it has generated? $790 billion. barack obama wants to raise it. they want to cut its. one thing they have not disavowed is they intend to cut medicaid by 33% over 10 years and get back to the state of ohio. medicaid provid
it to the future in the new defense strategy as we try to work through what the rules of the different services are to the defense strategy, i almost remind everyone that going to be downsizing during this time. the army who went to beginning of county or 12 will go down to 490,000 active component by the end of 17. so we have significant deployed commitments. we are downsizing our army and now looking to the future. the main thing is we have to ensure we have the right mix. there was talk about the secretary of the army and i pay a lot of attention to. that's modernization, readiness. because in general terms, those are the drivers of our budget. you have to this imbalance. we want to learn from the lessons of past drawdown. some of the lessons is to kick it out of balance because if you get out of balance come you start to have an unready army, which leads to a hollow army. of course they talk a lot about task force smith and its impact and unprepared and assesses us to go to korea post-world war ii. we don't want that to happen again. for the secretary of the army and i have been clear that
as a country but we don't play defense very well. and that's the problem. even our own-- . >> rose: if are you playing defense you can lose one time and you have lost the game. >> precisely so they can do lots of things. and it's something that we as a country have to focus on, have to put resources into. i mean obviously this is the after smat of this hurricane is going to require lots of resoces too. but cyberterrorism is a reality. to know that people are doing things to out the world, you know, shutting down countries. we've seen for, we saw what happened in the ukraine with the russians doing it, kpon knowledge. >> rose: what is happening in mali right now a lot of other places. >> absolutely. so it's going to be the new frontier. it's going to be the new front in the war. >> rose: when you look at what you have had to do, what has been the hardest thing for you as being in charge of new yrk police. >> at inn this storm. >> rose: in response to this storm. >> well, you know, just the requirement of having a large numbers of police officers in the affected areas. we are shutting down or gr
including his deputy assistant secretary of defense for asia pacific, director of the national security council staff, deputy special counsel to the president and the white house, and why do so at the department of treasury. for his service he received the department of defense medals for distinguished metal service and for outstanding public service. user doesn't officer in the u.s. navy, the joint chiefs of staff, and chief of naval operations special intelligence unit. doctor campbell received his ba from university of california san diego, certificate in music and political philosophy from the university and soviet armenia, and his doctorate in international relations from oxford university what he was a marshall scholar. to my any of his richard solomon who is the assistant of state for for east asia and pacific affairs in 1989-1982 for president george h. w. bush. he served as president of united states institute of peace since 1993 during which time he oversaw its growth into a center of international conflict management analysis in applied programs. during his service in governm
climbed atop the roof until the man holding an rgb during my defense. i was visually acquire really out of the to call it air support when i was hit. everything went black. that day, my world went black, too. my daughters came home to care for their broken parent, my oldest return to washington state for his fifth tour aboard struggled to take care of their four -month-old son. my youngest daughter left her beloved naval academy to take care of her grieving mother father during months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond, georgia and surrounding areas welcomed matthew home with tears, flags and salutes. the streets are lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing at his memorial service as a method in church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout and a local boy scout by collecting pens and paper and sent them to matthew's unit in afghanistan. a dear friend, jim bunn who is involved in media had a vision and the matthew freeman project again. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film th
agencies that are in charge, including the department of defense, department of energy, and those that are going to need to respond very quickly. under craig fewgate's leadership at fema, we've had a chance to talk to the regional officials as well and i just had a phone call with the governors of potentially impacted states as well as some of the major cities in the region. at this stage, everybody is confident that the staging process, the prepositioning of presource, commodities, equipment that are going to be needed to respond to the storm are in place, but as craig has emphasized, this hasn't hit landfall yet, so we don't yet know where it's going to hit, where we're going to see the biggest impacts, and that's exactly why it's so important for us to respond big and respond fast as local information starts coming in. i want to thank hall the members of the team -- all the members of the team for the outstanding work they're doing but the other thing that makes this storm unique, we anticipate it is going to be slow moving. that means that it may take a long time not only to c
at the same time. although we have coast guard and the department of defense position, if the public is not following instructions, that makes it more dangerous for people, and it makes the dutch of four fatalities that could of been avoided. transportation will be tied up for a long time. perhaps the most of the impact, aside from flooding, will be putting the power back on. we anticipate a lot of trees down, a lot of water. despite the fact that the power companies are working very closely with their various state officials and local officials to make sure they are bringing in as many assets as possible and getting those ready in preparation for the storm, the fact is, many of these emergency crews will not be able to get in position to begin restoring power until the wind had died down. because of the nature of most o, aside from flooding, will be putting the power back on. we anticipate a lot of trees down, a lot of water. the storm, that may take several days. the public should anticipate that there will be a lot of power outages, and it may take time for that power to get back
, and the secretary of defense sit and watch what happened in real time and not send aid to those people, if everybody understood that is what happened. then they went out and made up a story that it was some unruly mob when it was clearly a planned attack by al qaeda. guest: i think there are a lot of problems with that. there were not watching in real time. i don't want to get into the specifics of the actual and got the attack or anything around it. however, i think there's something important to be done. the full story will be reported. there will be investigations both by the house of representatives and by the state department. republicans to control the house of representatives, by the way. we look forward to those things coming out. whether or not expect a robust surprise, and pretty sure it's not, i'm pretty sure most voters are not paying attention to it and are not taking a close look at it. we will see how it all plays out. -- i am pretty sure it is not the october surprise. host: there's the "washington times" -- guest: this is the nebraska senate seat and senator ben nelson is retiring.
wants to increase defense spending almost without limit. and yet the president is willing to make the hard but smart decisions based upon what the military needs. that seems to go to a fundamental decision, explain that a bit more for us. >> yes the -- i'm a former member of the budget committee. but the joint chiefs of staff request military spending at a certain level. the amount we're spending is far above that because congress usually adds on favorite construction projects and military armament projects and by the way the big labor unions support those also. so we're spending more than is recommended and our national security is not any better. in fact, it would be -- we would have stronger national security if we spent more wisely on weapons as president obama has suggested. but what's happened is that everybody talks about being for veterans. veterans are almost overpraised these days and i think part of it is a subconscious thing to make up for the days when they weren't thanked. but in any event the budget i
this was some famous, recent secretary of defense said the knowns and the unknowns. i am stopping, it's my last sentence. [laughter] i hate when they -- baathist. [laughter] i couldn't help that. i couldn't help that. losing syria, as rumsfeld once said, maybe it's wiser to insist on iraqi compliance. if we ignore baghdad's support for us and the risk of a lingering and endangered civil war and spillover into iraq and elsewhere grows. losing syria as a strategic ally will not cause the collapse of the government in iran, although it could weaken ahmadinejad even more than he's weakening anyway. weakening baghdad by threatening maliki, though, could have a major unintended consequence, and that is this: could push maliki, push him closer to tehran and away from possible rapprochement with iraq's arab neighbors which, in my humble opinion, is not a good idea. thank you. [applause] >> okay, so in my role as non-baathist moderator -- [laughter] inviting abdullahal sham marry -- alshammari to speak. >> thank you, it's a pleasure to speak with you. i should talk about iraq, then about syria, but i th
. according to this interpretation, then, hanoi's were was a defensive protected measure, although i agree that the southerner's cries for help were important to north vietnamese leaders, party leaders might have also had internal problems. their own internal problems on their minds when they made the decision to go to war. following an unpopular and unsuccessful land reform campaign facing increasing opposition and criticism from among the intelligents and major cities in north vietnam, and finding the road to socialism difficult with state plans not coming to fruition, party leaders concluded that revolutionary war in the south had the power to deflect powers in the north, wag the dog so to speak. in addition to parting the bamboo hedge that obscured decision making in hanoi and bringing them to center stage in the story, i recall how his military strategy prevented him from compromising at the negotiation table, and how war weariness affected the society, and how they were marginalized in the struggle, and how they were bullied #, and how america's allies in the saigon government manage
at all of the issue in the own politics. national defense he was a staunch anticommunist. and played an important role in right-wing anticommunist politics. it's one of the things that lead in to switch parties in 1964. he was a key figure in opposing labor unions. he did so alongside people like barry gold water. even though early in the career a staunch advocate of union in south carolina. back in the '30s and '40s. he switches in the '50s and '60s and becoming a die hard supporter of business against labor in '70s. its an important role in conservative even evangelical politics. he joins the board of bob jones university in 1950. he does to win votes in the country of south carolina. bob jones had moved to south carolina moved university and he needed votes in the south carolina. he lost the 1950 raise for the senate. and that began a long process a long relationship with strom with conservative moneyment lal and even evangelicallists who were looking to get involved in political process. we need understand the racial politics in the midst of these other conservative causes. these
's a document about the defense intelligence agency which is the defense department version of the cia. it basically says, our intelligence of weapons of mass destruction is terrible. we really don't know anything. and that is coming out at the same time that the administration is saying these things about, we're going to have mushroom clouds over new york. and so was their intelligence to say that there are weapons of mass destructions? yes. was it did? no. was there a lot of intelligence the other way? yes. one of the things that people forget, we sent the weapons inspectors back in. there with a bunch of you in inspectors and they said, we can't find anything. and that was not viewed as intelligence. that was viewed as let's make fun. and so, you know, it was a bad application of intelligence by people who thought they knew it with the answer was. >> yes. >> it sounds like based on what you say, a lot of the decisions made a based on faulty intelligence. i guess and just wondering, we are we pass the 500. we a lot of things on the rise in. >> actually, one of the more interesting co
particularly in recent years and most of all liberals did not fly dangerous missions in defense of our nation. this made his many critics who avoided military service especially uncomfortable. somewhere in some small town in this great land is the young man or a young woman who will learn of george mcgovern and his voice. some day that young man or woman drawn to action by his life as a shoice of conscience will rise up to call america home, to summon the better angels of our nature, to confront us with poverty and injustice and inquality. and to challenge us to live up to our constitutional promise. george mcgovern's voice is not gone, it's simply baiting the voice of conscience that have the voice of their conviction. [applause] good afternoon. at his funeral about his life george's father was born in stern figure, not the kind of man who would toss a baseball around with the boys in the brother were talking baseball said let me see that baseball and they thought they were in trouble because their dad did and through -- threw it on a straight line to the corner of apparently a transformativ
that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. (crowd cheers) >> narrator: and when goldwater received the nomination, mitt saw his father angrily storm out. >> i think that my father was always willing to live according to his principles. he didn't shy away from any challenge. he was a very strong person in doing that. and we learned that you have to live up to what you believe in. >> narrator: one thing george romney believed in was the vietnam war. and one year later, when mitt showed up at stanford university, he would adopt his father's position. >> so, he is very much on his father's side for the vietnam war at that time. he is really out of his element where the whole campus is being roiled by this anti-war and anti-establishment protest. >> narrator: mitt took on the protestors. >> mitt romney is a fairly rule-bound person. he actually protested the protestors. he held up a big sign that said, "go back to your studies." >> and we see the mitt romney who cares about rules and institutions and following orders. and that causes him to take a very dim view, i think, of the protest
, which every single solitary republican national security adviser and director of defense was for. he was against it. he said he never would have supported it. all of a sudden i found out that his new best buddy is russia. "we can work with russia. we can be very close with russia." i mean -- [laughter] [applause] he went from harshly criticizing us for saying that we will, and we will turn over full responsibility of the afghan military at the end of 2014 and come home, he went from saying that we should never have set a timetable, that he would not do that. i had a debate as well, with ryan. [applause] i and my debate with ryan, he was talking about having more troops and americans in there, we should not have set the date. along comes mitt romney. i generation came on the wings of a snow white dove, preaching love. i tell you what, man. it was amazing to me. i want to ask, as i asked congressman ryan, when i asked if he would leave, a guarantee, leave by 2014, he said that it depends. folks, in case you have not noticed, everything with mitt romney and paul ryan depends. it depends
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

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